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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of The impact of female schooling on fertility and contraceptive use found in the catalog.

The impact of female schooling on fertility and contraceptive use

Martha Ainsworth

The impact of female schooling on fertility and contraceptive use

a study of fourteen Sub-Saharan countries

by Martha Ainsworth

  • 290 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by World Bank in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan,
  • Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
  • Africa,Sub-Saharan.
    • Subjects:
    • Birth control clinics -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Utilization.,
    • Fertility, Human -- Social aspects -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
    • Women -- Education -- Africa,Sub-Saharan.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [65]-69).

      StatementMartha Ainsworth, Kathleen Beegle, Andrew Nyamete.
      SeriesLSMS working paper,, no. 110
      ContributionsBeegle, Kathleen, 1969-, Nyamete, Andrew, 1962-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ766.5.A357 A36 1995
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 69 p. :
      Number of Pages69
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1105265M
      ISBN 100821330195
      LC Control Number94030391

      Ayoub S. Ayoub: Effects of Women’s Schooling on Contraceptive Use and Fertility schooling. It is obvious that as the number of children increases, familial resources available to an individual child decrease. Restricting the number of children is the best solution in order to have better-educated children and more familial resources per child. Average Effects of Education on Fertility. Educated women delay the onset of childbearing and have fewer children overall compared with less-educated women (Blossfeld and Huinink ; Brewster and Rindfuss ; Caucutt et al. ; Martín-García and Baizán ; McCall ; Rindfuss et al. , ; Spain and Bianchi ).There are several, potentially congruent, explanations for why.

      This article is a review of research and findings on women’s education, contraceptives used and their effect on Nepalese fertility. This paper would also analysis the impact and situation of Nepalese women’s education and how to effect on their contraceptive behavior and fertility outcomes. The material is drawn from a range of Nepal Demographic Health surveys, Nepalese censuses and Author: Rameswor Baral. FIGURE Contraceptive use among women aged 15 to 49 in five sub-Saharan regions in and SOURCE: Bankole (). method at all is 40 percent. Abortion, however, plays an important role in limiting fertility in different parts of the region, he added; rates range from 15 to 38 abortions per 1, women aged 15 to

      This paper measures the impact of female schooling on fertility and child health. • Identification exploits an age discontinuity in exposure to free primary education. • Schooling delays and decreases fertility, and increases child health investments. • Mechanisms include delayed marriage and use of contraceptives before first birth. •. AbstractThis paper explores the causal relationship between female education and teenage fertility by exploiting a change in the compulsory schooling law (CSL) in Turkey. Using variation in the exposure to the CSL across cohorts and variation across provinces by the intensity of additional classrooms constructed in the birth provinces as an instrumental variable, the results indicate that.


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The impact of female schooling on fertility and contraceptive use by Martha Ainsworth Download PDF EPUB FB2

The effect of female schooling in lowering fertility was operating through its effect in lowering child mortality.

More effective use of contraception. Educated women can learn about and use contraception more effectively than uneducated women, reducing the File Size: 3MB. Female schooling has a positive relationship with contraceptive use at all levels.

Among ever-married women, husband's schooling exerts a smaller effect than does female schooling on contraceptive use and, in almost all cases, on by: 5. Female schooling has a positive relationship with contraceptive use at all levels. Among ever-married women, husband's schooling exerts a smaller effect than does female schooling on contraceptive.

Female schooling has a positive relationship with contraceptive use at all levels. Among ever-married women, husband's schooling exerts a smaller effect than doe's female schooling on contraceptive use and, in almost all cases, on by:   Female schooling has a positive relationship with contraceptive use at all levels.

Among ever-married women, husband's schooling exerts a smaller effect than does female schooling on contraceptive use and, in almost all cases, on by: use contraceptives.

We test the hypothesis that female education leads to higher contraceptive use which in turn leads to a lower fertility rate. The paper comes at an opportune time, when the debate on the likely implications of high population growth rates and the impact of female education on fertility is hottest in Uganda.

| Female education and its impact on fertility contraceptives and the knowledge of how to use them. A woman’s actual number of children falls somewhere between the number she desires and her natural fertility level. The influencing factors are age and fertility control. Supply of childrenCited by: 2.

In exploring the effects of women’s schooling on fertility and contraceptive use in Tanzania, two components will be examined. One component of the study measures the probability of controlling fertility rate due to women’s schooling.

that an extra year of female schooling reduces teenage fertility by births, which is a reduction of 33%. Exploring heterogeneous effects indicates that female education reduces teenage fertility more in provinces with higher initial fertility and lower popu-lation density.

Finally, the CSL postpones childbearing by delaying marriage thereby. This paper presents new evidence on the impact of female education on fertility in Egypt using the change in the length of primary schooling as the source of exogenous variation in education.

Beginning inthe Egyptian government cut the number of primary school years from six to five, moving from a year system of pre-university education to an year system. The Impact of Female Education on Fertility: there is a positive association between contraceptive method use and education.

Lastly, education is hypothesized to increase women’s autonomy and bargaining power in the female schooling indeed reduces fertility. The. Together, the studies make clear that the need to expand contraceptive use, maternal and child health services is more important than ever, and increasing school enrollments of girls is not even a partial alternative to achieve a decline in fertility.

(source: Nielsen Book Data). Baral Impact of women’s education and contraceptives use Contraceptives Use and Fertility Conclusion In an experimentally designed family planning and health program started in (FP/MCH) and in (ICHSP) for women in all over the Nepal, the Nepalese women benefiting from that program had reduced TFR over six child per women to : Rameswor Baral.

Among ever-married women, husband's schooling exerts a smaller effect than does female schooling on contraceptive use and, in almost all cases, on fertility.

Among ever-married women, husband's schooling has no significant relation with fertility in one-third of the countries and, when both women's and men's schooling matter, women's schooling exerts a much larger negative effect on fertility than men's schooling.

Even low levels of female schooling are found to have a positive relationship with contraceptive use, but higher levels of schooling have a Cited by: 4. Changes in childbearing affect almost every aspect of human existence.

Over the last fifty years, American women have experienced dramatic changes in the ease and convenience of timing and limiting childbearing, ranging from the introduction of the birth control pill and the legalization of abortion to more recent availability of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs).

to the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and may lead to damaging effects on an adolescent’s lifelong health and fertility. In response to this need for increased attention to adolescent fertility, the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) stressed the importance of taking adolescent sexual and.

The impact of female schooling on fertility and contraceptive use: a study of fourteen Sub-Saharan countries. Female education has a greater impact on age of marriage and delayed fertility than male education.

Although fertility falls when both male and female levels of education rise together, there is a large gap between male and female secondary school enrollment in.

The importance of contraceptive education can be seen in the impact of knowledge on the selection and correct and consistent use of contraception. Many women indicate that contraceptive effectiveness is one of the most important considerations when selecting a method. 4–7 Consistent with this priority, better knowledge of contraceptive.

The impact of women's schooling on fertility and contraceptive use: a study of fourteen Sub-Saharan African countries (الانكليزية) الخلاصة This article examines the relationship between female schooling and two behaviors, cumulative fertility and contraceptive use, in fourteen Sub-Saharan African countries where Demographic."The Impact of Women's Schooling on Fertility and Contraceptive Use: A Study of Fourteen Sub-Saharan African Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol.

.identify the impact of male and female schooling on child mortality and fertility. Angrist, Bettinger, Bloom, King, and Kremer () study the impact of school vouchers in Columbia.

3 Unlike other related work, however, changes in contraceptive use and legal statues, such as the legalization of.